Tag Archives: sharks

  • December 29, 2015

    The Fall 2015 Wild Oceans Horizon

    In the cover story of the Fall 2015 issue of the Wild Oceans Horizon, president Ken Hinman writes about emerging threats to the Arctic Sea from global warming, which is not only melting the sea ice but opening up this fragile polar ecosystem to unregulated shipping, oil exploration and commercial fishing (The Plight of the...
  • September 01, 2015

    The Summer 2014 Wild Oceans Horizon

    Wonder what’s on the horizon for Atlantic striped bass, west coast swordfish or deep sea corals?  Check outthe latest issue of our newsletter, the Wild Oceans Horizon.  Other featured stories include our priorities for the reauthorization of the Magnuson-Stevens Conservation and Management Act, with a special Ocean View commentary by Wild Oceans President Ken Hinman.
  • February 27, 2015

    Sharks, Rays Win New Trade Protections

    Five species of sharks and two types of manta rays won new safeguards Monday, as delegates to a global wildlife summit voted to limit the trade of species that have been overharvested for decades. http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/sharks-rays-win-new-trade-protections/2013/03/11/c4f8997e-8a7a-11e2-8d72-dc76641cb8d4_story.html
  • January 17, 2013

    NOAA Fisheries Implements International Provisions of the Shark Conservation Act

    NOAA Fisheries has stepped up measures to protect sharks from the lucrative shark fin trade. New regulations issued on January 16th to implement international provisions of the Shark Conservation Act of 2010 require the United States to identify nations whose fishing vessels catch sharks on the high seas but whose regulations are not up to...
  • January 17, 2013

    NOAA Fisheries Implements International Provisions of the Shark Conservation Act

    NOAA Fisheries has stepped up measures to protect sharks from the lucrative shark fin trade. New regulations issued on January 16th to implement international provisions of the Shark Conservation Act of 2010 require the United States to identify nations whose fishing vessels catch sharks on the high seas but whose regulations are not up to...
  • January 02, 2013

    Bring back the big fish

    By removing too many of the sea’s keystone predators. We weaken an entire tier at the top of the food chain. This may have dire biological consequences throughout the ecosystem far beyond the social. Economic and moral costs of depleted ocean fisheries