Tag Archives: big fish

  • July 25, 2018

    No Going Back

    The National Marine Fisheries Service is questioning whether long-standing measures to minimize longline bycatch, such as time-area closures, are still needed.  The answer is most emphatically yes. No Going Back by Ken Hinman July 2018 The first meaningful action taken to reduce bycatch in the U.S. pelagic longline fisheries occurred in the year 2000 –...
  • August 26, 2017

    The Pacific Bluefin: Down But Not Out – Yet

    With ESA Listing Denied, Attention Shifts Back to International Management Bodies by Ken Hinman The U.S. government earlier this month denied a petition to list Pacific bluefin tuna under the Endangered Species Act, citing recent international actions that may have stabilized the population and could, if continued, put bluefin on “a positive trajectory.” NOAA Fisheries,…

  • December 29, 2015

    The Fall 2015 Wild Oceans Horizon

    In the cover story of the Fall 2015 issue of the Wild Oceans Horizon, president Ken Hinman writes about emerging threats to the Arctic Sea from global warming, which is not only melting the sea ice but opening up this fragile polar ecosystem to unregulated shipping, oil exploration and commercial fishing (The Plight of the...
  • October 06, 2015

    Unfinished Business

    “There are still threats to big fish that need our attention” By Ken Hinman In this summer’s edition of the Wild Oceans Horizon, I wrote about the tremendous progress we’ve made securing measures to save big fish from indiscriminate fishing and aid in the recovery of billfish, bluefin tuna and oceanic sharks. Today, large areas…

  • September 01, 2015

    The Summer 2014 Wild Oceans Horizon

    Wonder what’s on the horizon for Atlantic striped bass, west coast swordfish or deep sea corals?  Check outthe latest issue of our newsletter, the Wild Oceans Horizon.  Other featured stories include our priorities for the reauthorization of the Magnuson-Stevens Conservation and Management Act, with a special Ocean View commentary by Wild Oceans President Ken Hinman.
  • January 02, 2013

    Bring back the big fish

    By removing too many of the sea’s keystone predators. We weaken an entire tier at the top of the food chain. This may have dire biological consequences throughout the ecosystem far beyond the social. Economic and moral costs of depleted ocean fisheries